Tables should only be used to organize data into a logical relationship grid and SHOULD NOT be used to position elements on a web page. Should a table be used for layout purposes, if absolutely necessary there is the option to use multiple simple tables, (one header row and one header) column to simplify things.



ADA Review Checklist

While it is not necessary for ADA compliance, we recommend that each table is within its own HTML WYSIWYG widget for better responsiveness.

  1. Is the table being used for page structure?
    If the table is being used for page structure you should consider rebuilding that section of the page using a mix of the Row and other available widgets. While it will take some additional work, tables should only be used in the presentation of data/information and nothing else.

  2. Does the table have a row or column that is set as a header?
    All tables need to have either a row or column that is specifically set as a header. You can check this by editing the widget and press CTRL and click on the table, select Table Properties from the menu that appears. Verify on the next menu that First Row, First Column or Both is selected in the Headers field.

    To help make reading order more logical for a sight-impaired user associate cells with their headers in tables, using scope="col" and scope="row".


  3. Is the table complex, containing a lot of information?
    If the table is 'complex' and contains a lot of information, a summary should be included for ADA compliance.  You can check this by editing the widget and press CTRL and click on the table, select Table Properties from the menu that appears. Verify on the next menu that the Summary field contains a summary of the data that is in the table.



Additional Resources